A podiatrist explains the terrible things that can happen to your feet if you run too much


Podiatric surgeon Dr. Jacqueline Sutera explains what could happen to our feet if we run too much and over-train for that next half marathon. Following is a transcript of the video.

Running is a super-high-impact sport, and there's a lot of, like, body weight with every step that you take. It increases by about seven times your body weight with every step that you take when you're running.

You can develop heel spurs, that plantar fasciitis — That just means that there is inflammation at the bottom of the foot. Tendinitis, stress fractures, knee pain, hip pain, back pain — the list goes on and on.

I think fractures are the worst thing, 'cause it really takes a long time to heal. So, a lot of tendon issues and plantar fasciitis, those can be a couple weeks, but once you fracture your foot, you're talking six to eight weeks of no running. And this leads to a lot of tears in my office.

People cry, and you know, they're training for the marathon they love it, this is such a stress reliever, and all of a sudden it's like you come to a screeching halt. Time out. No running for two months.

So, I think that's probably one of the worst things that can happen because you really have to be off your feet, and in a cast or in a boot, and physical therapy. Sometimes even surgery. You can break your toe bones, or your foot bones, or your ankle bones so bad that they need to be reset surgically. And that's even longer of a recovery.

Make sure that your sneakers are in good shape. Do not wear shoes that are old and worn out, or that you borrowed
from your sister, or that you got at a garage sale, or that you've had in your closet for three years. They need to
be specifically running shoes and they have to be in really good shape. Do not wear those shoes out and about.

So, if you want to be serious about your running, you really need to have a running pair of sneakers that are dedicated just for running. So, if you don't have the shoes that are giving you the shock absorption, the cushioning, the arch support that you need, it can affect your whole entire skeleton, it doesn't just stop at your feet. So, it goes
all the way up.

 

 

 

 

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